Trevor
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Containers

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Hello Container Specialists,

Got a trivial query for you: Is there any difference between a Linux container and a
Docker container?   I often times see references to both.

Thanks in advance for your input.

Stay and well!!!

Trevor "Red Hat Evangelist" Chandler
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Alexandre
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Hello @Trevor 

Some time ago I have found a good article about:

https://www.tutorialworks.com/difference-docker-containerd-runc-crio-oci/

May it will be usefull for you

Good lack, Alexandre

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Alexandre
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Hello @Trevor 

Some time ago I have found a good article about:

https://www.tutorialworks.com/difference-docker-containerd-runc-crio-oci/

May it will be usefull for you

Good lack, Alexandre

Trevor
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Hello Alexandre,

Many thanks for the link to the article.

That will definitely quinch the thirst of my query!

Hope you're safe and well!!!

 

Trevor "Red Hat Evangelist" Chandler
Tracy_Baker
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Hi @Trevor 

The answer is no.

It used to be said that all containers were Linux containers because a container is really nothing more than an isolated Linux process and, as such, are native to the Linux OS. It was also a reference to the fact that there were no containers in Windows - but now there are.

The easiest way to think of Docker is that it is the software, or tool, that configures containers. Its sort of like "aspirin." At one point in time, it was a brand name that was owned by Bayer. Now it refers to anything acetylsalicylic acid. In this sense, Docker was the tool that a lot (most?) people used to create, manage, and destroy containers and, because of this, became somewhat synonymous with "containers."

There are other tools, like Podman - used in RH134 and DO180 courses. (This was done because running containers as the root user can be a security risk. Podman allows for rootless containers. When Podman was adopted by RH for the courses, Docker could only run containers as the root user.) There are others.

So: One is the tool (Podman, Docker) and one is the isloated process (container) created, maintaned, and destroyed by the tool.

Program Lead at Arizona's first Red Hat Academy, est. 2005
Estrella Mountain Community College
Trevor
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What are you doing out here trolling the galaxy on a Sunday Starfighter?  Only the committed would be out here - of course, that's what and who you are!!!

Thanks for the masterful explanation.  I was moving along smoothly until I hit that "acetylsalicylic" word.  I had to pull over on the side of the road for about 10 minutes to decode that one.

Your explanation has lifted the fog.  I not only have a much better understanding, but I'm not in a position to be able to articulate a response should a similar query come my way.

Thanks Tracy.  Hope you're safe and well!!!

 

 

Trevor "Red Hat Evangelist" Chandler
Tracy_Baker
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Thanks Trevor, I very much wish that you and yours are well and happy!

Program Lead at Arizona's first Red Hat Academy, est. 2005
Estrella Mountain Community College
Trevor
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Back atcha Tracy!!!

 

Trevor "Red Hat Evangelist" Chandler
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