san
Cadet
Cadet
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kernel panic

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If suppose my kernel goes into panic mode then how can i remove kernel from panic mode using command?

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oldbenko
Moderator
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Hi, @san,

I moved your post to this section of discussions, because it is about Linux and not about Red Hat Learning Subscription.

With that being said, I'm afraid the reason why the Linux kernel enters the "panic" mode can be one of two things:

  • the error that the kernel encountered is so severe that it can not recover and resume normal operation
  • the error that happened is putting the system in danger of data loss if the operation was to continue

Because of that, the kernel will refuse to perform any further operation and effectively halts the system.

So the only way to recover from a kernel panic is to carefully examine the reason for it, figure out if there are some corrective actions that need to be taken (like, replace faulty hardware, examine the consistency of data, etc.) and then reboot the system.

A black cat crossing the street signifies that the animal is going somewhere.
[don't forget to kudo a helpful post or mark it as a solution!]

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oldbenko
Moderator
Moderator
  • 1,868 Views

Hi, @san,

I moved your post to this section of discussions, because it is about Linux and not about Red Hat Learning Subscription.

With that being said, I'm afraid the reason why the Linux kernel enters the "panic" mode can be one of two things:

  • the error that the kernel encountered is so severe that it can not recover and resume normal operation
  • the error that happened is putting the system in danger of data loss if the operation was to continue

Because of that, the kernel will refuse to perform any further operation and effectively halts the system.

So the only way to recover from a kernel panic is to carefully examine the reason for it, figure out if there are some corrective actions that need to be taken (like, replace faulty hardware, examine the consistency of data, etc.) and then reboot the system.

A black cat crossing the street signifies that the animal is going somewhere.
[don't forget to kudo a helpful post or mark it as a solution!]
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macplox
Flight Engineer Flight Engineer
Flight Engineer
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Kernel panics are generally preceded by kernel oops events. Oopses typically leave the system in a "recovered" state, but "crippled" or "unstable" is a better way to think of it, because the system now becomes more prone to failure with any additional oopses. If you're seeing a lot of oops messages on the console, see what's the offending process/event/hardware and you'll find your solutions by fixing those problems. If you don't see a pattern in oops/panic events, consider hardware such as memory and power supply, as the likely source of the problem.

EDIT: Have a look here if you're trying to squeeze out the very last of the kernel's functionality in situations indicating kernel panic and lockout are inevitable/impending: https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/admin-guide/sysrq.html
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