ravbahra
Cadet
Cadet
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RHCSA exam doubts

Hi everyone,

I want to take rhcsa exam soon. I have been going through discussions regarding exam environment. I want to know if the following rumors are correct.

1. we cannot use ssh in exam just need to use vm console to take an exam. 

2. man pages are disabled.

3. Any log messages for sealert are disabled. In order to attempt selinux questions we cannot find anything in logs.

Thank you in advance. 

 

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3 Replies
  • 1,190 Views

No,

You connect through sah to all servers.
Man pages are allowed.
Selinux messages are available.
Chetan_Tiwary_
Moderator
Moderator
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Hello @ravbahra !

Thanks for reaching out !

man pages are not disabled, why would it be disabled ? It is a basic documentation available for us in the linux system.

Not sure about the exam environment - but I think ssh access is enabled ( you need to read the exam instruction clearly to see that ). If it is not , then you need to use the console. Key is to read and understand the exam instructions.

No logs are disabled - that is the only method to check for errors and troubleshooting an issue. 

Prepare for the exam objectives from here : https://www.redhat.com/en/services/training/ex200-red-hat-certified-system-administrator-rhcsa-exam?... 

All the best !

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Tracy_Baker
Starfighter Starfighter
Starfighter
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I'll add this: stop paying attention to rumors. Pay attention to the published objectives.

In essence, you'll be working on a fully functional system that has no internet connection. The important aspect of this is that all the documentation and help that comes with a RHEL system is available.

With that said: if you spend too much time in the man pages / help / documentation, you are not prepared for the exam and will very likely fail. Why? Because it is a timed test. You need to spend time doing tasks and not reading documentation; therefore, you need to know what you're doing before you go into it. The man pages / help / documentation should support what you're doing, not act as a replacement for knowledge.

(Which is why I teach my students how to efficiently use the various forms of documentation.)

Everything should work, unless it is part of a testing scenario. In that instance, once you fix it, it should work.

Program Lead at Arizona's first Red Hat Academy, est. 2005
Estrella Mountain Community College
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