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GoLang Operator For Beginners

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Hello Team, 

I am new to operators and looking for handson tutorials to build custom golang operator for application deployment. 

 

Thanks In Advance,

JSR

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2 Solutions

Accepted Solutions
Chetan_Tiwary_
Moderator
Moderator
  • 1,110 Views

Hello @snjonnaljsr !

Thanks for reaching out !

Here are some references for you, please do check out :

  1. https://sdk.operatorframework.io/docs/building-operators/golang/ 
  2. https://sdk.operatorframework.io/build/ 
  3. https://sdk.operatorframework.io/docs/building-operators/golang/tutorial/ 

Refer this github repo for hands on tutorials to explore :

  1. https://github.com/operator-framework/operator-sdk/ 

 

Refer a nice article on Operators :

https://www.redhat.com/en/technologies/cloud-computing/openshift/what-are-openshift-operators 

 

Explore with the OperatorHub.io as a resource for finding pre-built Operators for various applications. You can explore the source code of these Operators to learn from real-world examples :

https://operatorhub.io/ 

 

Check with the community slack here :

https://kubernetes.slack.com/ 

 

Check out some nice YouTube videos on the same:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ex7ybi273g&pp=ygVFaGFuZHNvbiB0dXRvcmlhbCB0byBidWlsZCBHb2xhbmcgT3Blc... 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHjLL5e7h00&pp=ygVFaGFuZHNvbiB0dXRvcmlhbCB0byBidWlsZCBHb2xhbmcgT3Blc... 

 

All the best !!

 

View solution in original post

AhmedEidNassef
Mission Specialist
Mission Specialist
  • 1,064 Views

Here's a step-by-step guide to building a custom Golang operator for application deployment:

Step 1: Set up the development environment

  • Install Golang: Download and install Go from the official website (https://golang.org) and set up your Go workspace.

Step 2: Choose an operator framework

  • Select an operator framework that suits your needs. Popular options for building Kubernetes operators in Golang include Operator SDK, Kubebuilder, and Metacontroller. Choose the one that aligns with your requirements and follow its installation instructions.

Step 3: Initialize a new operator project

  • Use the chosen operator framework to create a new operator project. This step typically involves running a command that sets up the project structure and generates boilerplate code for the operator.

Step 4: Define the custom resource definition (CRD)

  • Define the CRD for your custom resource. This defines the structure and behavior of your application deployment resource. Specify the desired fields, validation rules, and any custom logic required.

Step 5: Implement the operator logic

  • Write the operator logic to handle the lifecycle of your custom resource. This includes watching for events, reconciling the desired state with the current state, and performing actions such as deploying, updating, or scaling the application.

Step 6: Write unit tests

  • Create unit tests to validate the behavior of your operator. Write test cases to cover different scenarios and edge cases, ensuring that your operator functions as expected.

Step 7: Build and package the operator

  • Use the build tools provided by the operator framework to compile and package your operator code into a deployable artifact, such as a Docker container image or an operator bundle.

Step 8: Deploy and test the operator

  • Deploy your custom operator to a Kubernetes cluster. Verify that the operator starts watching for custom resource events and performs the expected actions based on the desired state.

Step 9: Iterate and improve

  • Iterate on your operator, gathering feedback, and making improvements based on real-world usage scenarios. Consider adding additional features, error handling, logging, and monitoring capabilities to enhance the reliability and observability of your operator.

Step 10: Document and share

  • Document your operator, including its capabilities, usage instructions, and any dependencies. Share your operator with the community by publishing it to a code repository, container registry, or an operator marketplace.

It's important to note that the exact steps and tools may vary depending on the chosen operator framework. I recommend referring to the official documentation and tutorials of the specific framework you are using for more detailed instructions.

Here are some resources to get you started with popular operator frameworks:

Following these steps and leveraging the resources provided by the operator framework should help you build a custom Golang operator for application deployment.

View solution in original post

4 Replies
Chetan_Tiwary_
Moderator
Moderator
  • 1,111 Views

Hello @snjonnaljsr !

Thanks for reaching out !

Here are some references for you, please do check out :

  1. https://sdk.operatorframework.io/docs/building-operators/golang/ 
  2. https://sdk.operatorframework.io/build/ 
  3. https://sdk.operatorframework.io/docs/building-operators/golang/tutorial/ 

Refer this github repo for hands on tutorials to explore :

  1. https://github.com/operator-framework/operator-sdk/ 

 

Refer a nice article on Operators :

https://www.redhat.com/en/technologies/cloud-computing/openshift/what-are-openshift-operators 

 

Explore with the OperatorHub.io as a resource for finding pre-built Operators for various applications. You can explore the source code of these Operators to learn from real-world examples :

https://operatorhub.io/ 

 

Check with the community slack here :

https://kubernetes.slack.com/ 

 

Check out some nice YouTube videos on the same:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ex7ybi273g&pp=ygVFaGFuZHNvbiB0dXRvcmlhbCB0byBidWlsZCBHb2xhbmcgT3Blc... 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHjLL5e7h00&pp=ygVFaGFuZHNvbiB0dXRvcmlhbCB0byBidWlsZCBHb2xhbmcgT3Blc... 

 

All the best !!

 

  • 1,091 Views

Thank You So Much @Chetan_Tiwary_ . Indeed very helpful !!

 

 

AbbasMohammed
Mission Specialist
Mission Specialist
  • 1,105 Views

Dears, 

I am not good at neither golang nor application development but basics known below.

Basic knowledge of Kubernetes and containerization
Familiarity with the Go programming language, Use the Operator SDK to create a new operator project
Define a Custom Resource Definition (CRD) to represent your application,Write the Go code for your operator's reconciliation logic then build deploy operator

AhmedEidNassef
Mission Specialist
Mission Specialist
  • 1,065 Views

Here's a step-by-step guide to building a custom Golang operator for application deployment:

Step 1: Set up the development environment

  • Install Golang: Download and install Go from the official website (https://golang.org) and set up your Go workspace.

Step 2: Choose an operator framework

  • Select an operator framework that suits your needs. Popular options for building Kubernetes operators in Golang include Operator SDK, Kubebuilder, and Metacontroller. Choose the one that aligns with your requirements and follow its installation instructions.

Step 3: Initialize a new operator project

  • Use the chosen operator framework to create a new operator project. This step typically involves running a command that sets up the project structure and generates boilerplate code for the operator.

Step 4: Define the custom resource definition (CRD)

  • Define the CRD for your custom resource. This defines the structure and behavior of your application deployment resource. Specify the desired fields, validation rules, and any custom logic required.

Step 5: Implement the operator logic

  • Write the operator logic to handle the lifecycle of your custom resource. This includes watching for events, reconciling the desired state with the current state, and performing actions such as deploying, updating, or scaling the application.

Step 6: Write unit tests

  • Create unit tests to validate the behavior of your operator. Write test cases to cover different scenarios and edge cases, ensuring that your operator functions as expected.

Step 7: Build and package the operator

  • Use the build tools provided by the operator framework to compile and package your operator code into a deployable artifact, such as a Docker container image or an operator bundle.

Step 8: Deploy and test the operator

  • Deploy your custom operator to a Kubernetes cluster. Verify that the operator starts watching for custom resource events and performs the expected actions based on the desired state.

Step 9: Iterate and improve

  • Iterate on your operator, gathering feedback, and making improvements based on real-world usage scenarios. Consider adding additional features, error handling, logging, and monitoring capabilities to enhance the reliability and observability of your operator.

Step 10: Document and share

  • Document your operator, including its capabilities, usage instructions, and any dependencies. Share your operator with the community by publishing it to a code repository, container registry, or an operator marketplace.

It's important to note that the exact steps and tools may vary depending on the chosen operator framework. I recommend referring to the official documentation and tutorials of the specific framework you are using for more detailed instructions.

Here are some resources to get you started with popular operator frameworks:

Following these steps and leveraging the resources provided by the operator framework should help you build a custom Golang operator for application deployment.

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